Is wedding videography a good investment?

  |   weddings   |   No comment

The folks over at Long Haul Films have created a little video for their blog about why hiring a wedding videographer is a great investment. Our thoughts on the matter are mirrored in our FAQ page, but we’ll be happy to reiterate.

At first glance, it might seem that hiring a videographer/filmmaker for your wedding is redundant, because you are most likely planning on hiring a photographer. But in our experience shooting and watching many, many competitor’s videos ourselves, is that nothing could be further from the truth. The sounds, movement, feelings and details that a talented videographer captures and edits into a short film are going to feel completely different than what you are getting from your photographs. Not to mention that without a videographer, the memories of certain aspects of your vows, speeches, dances and other formalities might be lost. We always encourage our would-be clients to do their research and plan a face-to-face meeting to ask questions – not everyone offers the same thing, or films the same way!

There are many wedding videographers around, some good, some not-so-good, and some spectacular. But the important thing is, there is always someone who will be able to fit your style, or particular price-point.

 

(Photograph credit: Alicia Ann Photographers)
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Picture of The Branford House at sunset, Groton, CT

Time lapse shot of the Branford House

  |   equipment, sample, screengrab, venues, video, weddings   |   No comment

This past weekend at Rachel and Anthony’s wedding held at The Branford House, we decided to try something new with the latest edition to our equipment rollout. We recently purchased the tiny, but ever-so-useful GoPro Hero 3+ Black and set it on a Joby Gorillapod on the grass after the ceremony was over. We set the duration for 1 frame a second, hit the start button, and let it sit there until dark. After a few hours, the battery still had juice and we’re pretty happy with the results for our first try. Check it out below!

 

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Riding in style: Vintage Mercedes 300D

  |   vehicles, weddings   |   No comment

Most of the time, people getting married aren’t riding around in anything mentionable. (White Lincoln stretch, what?).

But every now and then, someone gets whisked away in something really special, and this was one of those times. While filming the wedding of Jennifer and Glen in Branford, CT, we snapped a quick shot of this gorgeous vintage 1960 Mercedes-Benz 300D. (Car guys might be scratching their heads at the “D” right about now, but no, it wasn’t a diesel.)

 

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Inteligent Transitions In UX Design

  |   Design   |   No comment
T

he term minimalism is also used to describe a trend in design and architecture where in the subject is reduced to its necessary elements. Minimalist design has been highly influenced by Japanese traditional design and architecture. In addition, the work of De Stijl artists is a major source of reference for this kind of work.

 

Architect Ludwig Mies van der Rohe adopted the motto Less is more to describe his aesthetic tactic of arranging the numerous necessary components of a building to create an impression of extreme simplicity, by enlisting every element and detail to serve multiple visual and functional purposes (such as designing a floor to also serve as the radiator, or a massive fireplace to also house the bathroom). Designer Buckminster Fuller adopted the engineer’s goal of Doing more with less, but his concerns were oriented towards technology and engineering rather than aesthetics. A similar sentiment was industrial designer Dieter Rams’ motto, Less but better adapted from Mies. The structure uses relatively simple elegant designs; ornamentations are quality rather than quantity.

 

Using sometimes the beauty of natural patterns on stone cladding and real wood encapsulated within ordered simplified structures, and real metal producing a simplified but prestigious architecture and interior design. May use color brightness balance and contrast between surface colors to improve visual aesthetics. The structure would usually have industrial and space age style utilities (lamps, stoves, stairs, technology, etc.), neat and straight components (like walls or stairs) that appear to be machined with equipment, flat or nearly flat roofs, pleasing negative spaces, and large windows to let in lots of sunlight.

 

This and science fiction may have contributed to the late twentieth century futuristic architecture design, and modern home decor. Modern minimalist home architecture with its unnecessary internal walls removed probably have led to the popularity of the open plan kitchen and living room style. De Stijl expanded the ideas that could be expressed by using basic elements such as lines and planes organized in very particular manners.

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Josh Woodward – Already There Remix

  |   Music   |   No comment
T

he term minimalism is also used to describe a trend in design and architecture where in the subject is reduced to its necessary elements. Minimalist design has been highly influenced by Japanese traditional design and architecture. In addition, the work of De Stijl artists is a major source of reference for this kind of work.

 

Architect Ludwig Mies van der Rohe adopted the motto Less is more to describe his aesthetic tactic of arranging the numerous necessary components of a building to create an impression of extreme simplicity, by enlisting every element and detail to serve multiple visual and functional purposes (such as designing a floor to also serve as the radiator, or a massive fireplace to also house the bathroom). Designer Buckminster Fuller adopted the engineer’s goal of Doing more with less, but his concerns were oriented towards technology and engineering rather than aesthetics. A similar sentiment was industrial designer Dieter Rams’ motto, Less but better adapted from Mies. The structure uses relatively simple elegant designs; ornamentations are quality rather than quantity.

 

Using sometimes the beauty of natural patterns on stone cladding and real wood encapsulated within ordered simplified structures, and real metal producing a simplified but prestigious architecture and interior design. May use color brightness balance and contrast between surface colors to improve visual aesthetics. The structure would usually have industrial and space age style utilities (lamps, stoves, stairs, technology, etc.), neat and straight components (like walls or stairs) that appear to be machined with equipment, flat or nearly flat roofs, pleasing negative spaces, and large windows to let in lots of sunlight.

 

This and science fiction may have contributed to the late twentieth century futuristic architecture design, and modern home decor. Modern minimalist home architecture with its unnecessary internal walls removed probably have led to the popularity of the open plan kitchen and living room style. De Stijl expanded the ideas that could be expressed by using basic elements such as lines and planes organized in very particular manners.

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Madrid’s photographer marathon

  |   Photography   |   No comment

 

T

he term minimalism is also used to describe a trend in design and architecture where in the subject is reduced to its necessary elements. Minimalist design has been highly influenced by Japanese traditional design and architecture. In addition, the work of De Stijl artists is a major source of reference for this kind of work.

Architect Ludwig Mies van der Rohe adopted the motto Less is more to describe his aesthetic tactic of arranging the numerous necessary components of a building to create an impression of extreme simplicity, by enlisting every element and detail to serve multiple visual and functional purposes (such as designing a floor to also serve as the radiator, or a massive fireplace to also house the bathroom). Designer Buckminster Fuller adopted the engineer’s goal of Doing more with less, but his concerns were oriented towards technology and engineering rather than aesthetics. A similar sentiment was industrial designer Dieter Rams’ motto, Less but better adapted from Mies. The structure uses relatively simple elegant designs; ornamentations are quality rather than quantity.

Using sometimes the beauty of natural patterns on stone cladding and real wood encapsulated within ordered simplified structures, and real metal producing a simplified but prestigious architecture and interior design. May use color brightness balance and contrast between surface colors to improve visual aesthetics. The structure would usually have industrial and space age style utilities (lamps, stoves, stairs, technology, etc.), neat and straight components (like walls or stairs) that appear to be machined with equipment, flat or nearly flat roofs, pleasing negative spaces, and large windows to let in lots of sunlight.

This and science fiction may have contributed to the late twentieth century futuristic architecture design, and modern home decor. Modern minimalist home architecture with its unnecessary internal walls removed probably have led to the popularity of the open plan kitchen and living room style. De Stijl expanded the ideas that could be expressed by using basic elements such as lines and planes organized in very particular manners.

 

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